< 0/0 >

52 x 36 cm
20,5 x 14,2 inches


WIBIETOE was created by assembling several panels to a whole. In this print, the typical "blob" that Nick Ervinck often uses in a smaller variant dives. his whole oeuvre has been dragged with contradictions between conventional models from the architecture (box) and the virtual designs (blob). Here he chooses the third way: the synthesis of both.
This design, which extends like a web across the facade, exists out of a series of digital "blob sculptures": organic computer generated shapes that question the rigidity and immobility of architectural construction. This tension between 'blobs and boxes' is a constant in Nick Ervinck his oeuvre and translates through the application of various copy-paste techniques from 3D sculpture technology. The shape has emerged as an inspiration out of a pebble that falls into the water, the lines are spread as a network over the surface and can be easily interrupted. This network refers to the choices and different periods in life. The dynamic vortex indicates the complex times, as opposed to the motionless places that refer to the quiet periods in life.
However, these forms are not permanent in the virtual space, but are converted back into a graphical abstract. The result is a dynamic drawing referring to traditional graphics, but also to digital design. In his work, he is wondering the interchangeability between virtual and real space and focuses on the in situ relationship between sculpture and architecture.
The drawing therefore refers to an endless walk in nature. The drawing reminiscent of an ivy structure that appears to grow across the building itself. Growing, a concept that is very relevant in a school, and therefore refers directly to the "growth of the child". Nick does not want to underline the tension between the digital and the real, between the physical and the material and between technology and craft, he also wants to eliminate them by means of innovative design. The panels therefore shift the boundary between inside and outside. The panels are a second skin of the building, just as a child's protection.