• study for ESAVOBOR

  • study for ESAVOBOR

  • study for ESAVOBOR

  • study for ESAVOBOR

  • Greek vase, c. 500 BCE

  • Transformers robot

  • Movement, Guido Mocafico, 2006

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ESAVOBOR, 2011 - 2012
3D print
45 x 61 x 53 cm
17,7 x 24 x 20,9 inches

176

In order to reconstruct the past, an archaeologist interprets historical remains. As an artist wondering how this discipline can be relevant for his sculpting practice, Nick Ervinck starts from fragmentary pieces to build up a new personal and digital space.ESAVOBOR, recollecting a roman vase, is a hybrid entity which is build up with interconnecting parts. Ervinck never aims at closing this sculpture, he is rather interested in the aesthetics of unsounded reconstruction. ESAVOBOR looks like a transformer robot and heralds the possibility of a flexible metamorphosis: robots, as seen in popular sci-fi series and comics, are able to transform themselves easily. The artist proposes contemporary sculpture as an intermediate form which finds itself in a dynamic transitional phase. ESAVOBOR thus is a sculpture in flux. Though this use of 3D computer graphics may suggest a confrontation between the ancient civilizations and a possible digital future, Nick Ervinck wards off this possible clash and initiates a constructive dialogue between present, future and past, between craft and technology, and between the virtual and the physical. Ervinck's works recollect the inevitability of historical concepts and classifications, but at the same time he challenges this urge for artificial classification. ESAVOBOR thus reflects on our changing ways of thinking and feeling: the artist no longer makes art in order to represent the world, but rather to reinvent it.

2017   TRESOR contemporary Craft, Messe - Basel, CH
 
2014   GNI-RI feb2014, De Mijlpaal - Heusden-Zolder, BE
 
2012   GNI-RI sep2012, Gallo-Romeins Museum - Tongeren, BE